Tracks

The Bruny Island walking tracks are known for it's magnificent coastal views, rainforest, ferns, and extraordinary panoramic views. Amongst the lagoons, soaring sea-cliffs, coastal heathland, and 360 views are the natural wild-life and various species of birds. The walks vary form light pleasant terrains through to demanding and challenging climbs for the more adventurous.

Before selecting and planning a walk, please ensure that you have read all relevant information about the walk and note weather conditions for and on the day. Please note that this map and all maps produced for the Bruny Island web site are NOT 100% accurate. Therefore Bruny Island takes no responsibility for unintentional misleading information of the map tracks. Visitors who use these maps choose to at their own discretion. Please contact us for any queries about the tracks.

Adventure Bay: Fluted Cape

  • Difficulty: Challening
  • Terrain: Steep Climbs
  • Time: 3 Hours Return

The Fluted Cape walk allows you to experience dry forests, whaling history that took place, the Tasmanian Peninsula, soaring sea-cliffs, and the oportuniy to see sea-eagles. White Breasted Sea-Eagles can sometimes be seen along the cape soaring in the thermals. In walking this track, the circular route can be taken by following the Fluted Cape circuit signs. This track is a steep climb. By staying close to the coastal cliffs, spectacular views of the Fluted Cape and Tasmanian Peninsula can be experienced. Following these views, about 50 metres onward, a sign reading 'Fluted Cape Return via Circuit' will lead you on a gradual decent towards Adventure Bay. Please note that this walk should not be attempted by young children unless closely supervised.

Adventure Bay: Grassy Point

  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Terrain: Steep Climbs
  • Time: 90 Minutes Return

The Grassy Point walk allows you to experience whaling history, dry forest, and views of Southern Right Whales. Grassy Point is an open grassland where visible remains of structures associated with the bay whaling industry can be seen. Captain Kelley's whaling station was recently the subject of archaeological research. During migration season Southern Right Whales return to Adeventure Bay. Along this section of coast, they head north from June-September to late October. This walk is ideal for families as it is mainly flat terrain with gentle slopes. The walk commences at the Adventure Bay entrance of the National Park. Parking is available at the end of the Adventure Bay road. The walk is started along the short beach next to the car park, turn left.

Adventure Bay: Clennett's 'Top Mill' Site

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time: 30 Minutes Return

Clennett's 'Top Mill' will guide you through a prisitine eucalyptic rainforest environement, where vintage machinery and information boards can be seen along the way. An easy track to walk, Clennett's walk is located on the western side of Coolangatta Road.

Adventure Bay: Mavista

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time: 30 Minutes Return

Mavista Nature Walk is an easy 30 mins return walk. The walk guides you through a rainforest fern glade next to Waterfall Creek. Access is off Resolution road at Adventure Bay.

Adventure Bay: Mt Mangana

  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Time: 90 Minutes Return

Mount Mangana is a moderate 1.5 hours return walk. The walk guides you through a rainforest fern glade and eucalypt environment with spectacular panoramic views.

Adventure Bay: Slide Track

  • Difficulty: Demanding
  • Time: 6 Hours One-Way

Do Not attempt this walk without the map brochure for this walk which is available for purchase through retail outlets.

Maintained by Forestry Tasmania the Slide Track walk follows an abandoned timber-getting tramway for 13 kms (one-way) through dense forest and low vegetation. This track traverses rocky and undulating terrain through wet forest with slippery uneven surfaces and leeches. You will require robust footwear, warm clothing and wet weather gear as the weather can be upredictable. Pack food, drinks, insect repellent, and a small first aid kit.

Download Slide Track (pdf) Brochure Here. pg. 1 - pg. 2

Download Adobe Acrobat

Cape Bruny: Labillardiere Peninsula

  • Difficulty: Demanding
  • Time: 7 Hours Return

The Labillardiere Peninsula walk offers heathlands, exposed coastline, beaches, dry forests, and magnificaent coastal views. The track starts at the Jetty Beach campground and does a circuit around the peninsula. The track can be walked in either direction but for unobscured views of the coastline it is recommended commencing the walk on the western side. Once you have climbed Mt Bleak you will have a view of Partridge Island, which protects one of the largest populations of the endangered forty-spotted pardalote. From Mt Bleak the track descends to Hopwood and Butlers Beaches and from here it is about 2.5 - 3 hours walk through a light forest and finishes back at Jetty Beach. At Jetty Beach you can see the remains of the first jetty on the island, constructed in 1860 to supply the Cape Bruny Lighthouse.

Cape Bruny: Luggobine Circuit

  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Time: 90 Minutes Return

The Luggobine Circuit walk offers heathlands, exposed coastline, beaches, dry forests, and magnificaent coastal views. The track starts at the Jetty Beach campground and does a circuit around the peninsula. The track can be walked in either direction but for unobscured views of the coastline it is recommended commencing the walk on the western side. Once you have climbed Mt Bleak you will have a view of Partridge Island, which protects one of the largest populations of the endangered forty-spotted pardalote. From Mt Bleak the track descends to Hopwood and Butlers Beaches and from here it is about 2.5 - 3 hours walk through a light forest and finishes back at Jetty Beach. At Jetty Beach you can see the remains of the first jetty on the island, constructed in 1860 to supply the Cape Bruny Lighthouse.

Cloudy Bay: East Cloudy Head

  • Difficulty: Demanding
  • Time: 4 Hours Return

The East Cloudy Bay walk follows the coastline in which the bush and open pastures of South Bruny National Park provide a range of habitats for various species of birds. Over 120 species have been recorded on the island including the tawny-crowned honeyeater, Australasian gannet and ground parrot. When arriving park at the end of Cloudy Bay Road and walk about 45 minutes until you reach the southern end of the beach. Turn inland along Imlays Creek which you cross a number of times over 100 metres in distance until you reach a 4WD track. The walk follows the old 4WD track with a number of quite steep ascents and descents. Once you reach the headland you can return the way you came or continue on to Pine Log Bight. By walking down the eastern side of the headland you get a spectacular view of the 'pyramid' in Pyramid Bay. Upon reaching Pine Log Bight you will be greeted with spectacular views of the rugged coastline.

Great Bay: Cape Queen Elizabeth

  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Time: 3 Hours Return

The Cape Queen Elizabeth walk provides coastal heathland, spectacular views, Big and Little lagoon, forty-spotted pardalote, and beaches. The first part of the walk takes you along a track parallel with the Bruny Island air-strip, then runs between Big Lagoon and Little Lagoon, before steeply ascending Mars Bluff for great views across The Neck. The track follows the bluff before descending through the dunes onto the remote Miles Beach. Another track can also take you south to the cape for excellent views of Adventure Bay and beyond. This walk is within the Bruny Island Neck Game Reserve.

The 'Neck': Big Hummock

  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time: 10 Minutes Return

The 'Neck' is a timber stepped boardwalk that guides you to some of the most spectacular 360° panoramic views. The Truganini steps lead to the lookout and memorial to the Nuenonne people and Truganinni, who inhabited Lunnawannalonna (Bruny Island) before the European settlement of Bruny. 360° views from the top of the Lookout are spectacular and well worth the climb. At the base of the steps are boardwalks and viewing platforms where you can observe the short-tailed shearwaters and the little (fairy) penguins. Peak viewing times are from September to February... more